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Posted by on Apr 1, 2014 in ARTICLES

Harry Callahan: The Tate Modern

Harry Callahan: The Tate Modern

The work of Harry Callahan has been residing in the Tate Modern for almost four months now, and with another two months still to go, the exhibition persists to draw in an impressive audience. It was an Ansel Adams workshop, back in 1941, which encouraged Callahan to pursue the path of professional photography. Though he received little training, Callahan is perceived as one of the most influential post-war photographers. From cityscapes to close-ups of weeds, many of Callahan’s images have a simplicity with the ability to trigger one’s mind into wondering what his inspiration could possibly have been. The exhibition displays a variety of photographic methods experimented with at the hands of Callahan. From the light abstraction of ‘Chicago’ to the carefully pieced together fashion collage, ‘Cutouts’, it’s undeniable that each of Callahan’s creations received a lot of care and attention. A whole room of the exhibition is dedicated to the photographs Callahan captured of his wife; several subtle nude shots, a stark silhouette, and many shot on location,...

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Posted by on Mar 10, 2014 in ARTICLES

Bailey’s Stardust: National Portrait Gallery

Bailey’s Stardust: National Portrait Gallery

The iconic work of photographic legend, David Bailey, is currently being exhibited for public viewing at the National Portrait Gallery, on Trafalgar Square. More than 250 portraits, which will be displayed in the Lerner and Wolfson Galleries until June 1st, have been personally selected by David Bailey, himself, from the hundreds of subjects he has captured throughout his many decades as a professional photographer. Upon entering the exhibition, attention is immediately drawn towards the many famous faces that Bailey has photographed, beginning with an alluring 2013 portrait of Kate Moss, shamelessly promoting the pulled-through-a-hedge-backwards look. Each collection of celebrity portraits has been organised into groups, dependent upon the profession of the subjects, for example, fashion designers, actors and actresses, and singers. Some, such as the fantastically unusual portrait of Mia Farrow, date back to the 1960s. Others depict modern day icons such as Beyoncé and Noel Gallagher. The ‘Fashion Icons and Beauty’ selection was a particular highlight. Black and white shots of many designers including Tom Ford, Karl Lagerfeld...

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Posted by on Mar 10, 2014 in ARTICLES

In Kony’s Shadow: OXO Tower Wharf

In Kony’s Shadow: OXO Tower Wharf

Last week saw the two year anniversary of the release of Kony 2012, a short film made with the intention of drawing enough attention to African war criminal, Joseph Kony, that he be captured and arrested. As part of his Lord’s Resistance Army regime, Kony, who became prominent in the 1990s, was responsible for the abduction and recruitment of child soldiers in Uganda. The documentary reached more than 100 million views in just six days. Even Invisible Children Inc, who created the short film, could not have anticipated the rate at which it would spread across the internet. In order to mark the anniversary, on March 5th, Christian Aid opened In Kony’s Shadow, a photographic exhibition in the ground floor gallery at the OXO Tower Wharf, dedicated to those who survived Kony’s reign of terror. Though the exhibition is small, it can easily have a big impact on those viewing it. Each portrait photograph is accompanied by a survivor’s story, offering an insight into the lives of people who...

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Posted by on Jan 31, 2014 in ARTICLES

Behind The Mask

Behind The Mask

Somerset House has temporarily become home to a fantastic exhibition displaying portrait images of one hundred actors and actresses who have won or been nominated for BAFTA awards over the last 60 years. ‘Behind the Mask’ is a beautiful and thought-provoking collection of photographs captured by Andy Gotts MBE, who has specialised in portrait photography for 23 years. The exhibition is wonderfully extensive, dominating the entire West Wing of Somerset House. The collection includes many subjects known to millions of people across the world, including Robert De Niro, Sir Anthony Hopkins, Dame Helen Mirren and Helena Bonham-Carter. Each image was shot close up, creating stark appearances and allowing visitors to the exhibition an experience which feels very much like meeting the famous figures face-to-face. The project has taken over two years to create. When visiting, I couldn’t help but wonder what motivated Andy Gotts into creating such a large exhibition; he travelled far and wide to capture the images, making the process very time consuming. I asked Andy what...

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Posted by on Dec 24, 2013 in ARTICLES

Destination Christmas in  London!

Destination Christmas in London!

The festive period is perhaps the best time of year to visit the capital city. From the magical Winter Wonderland that dominates Hyde Park to the dazzling decorative lights down Oxford Street, there’s no denying that London has Christmas spirit. And judging by the photographs recently released by the Museum of London, the Christmas spirit isn’t something to have arrived in recent years. This is a festive Selfridges 60 years ago. The photograph is one of a collection of images released by the Museum of London, captured by Henry Grant, depicting Christmas in the capital in the 1950s and 1960s. This snap, along with 11 others, showing scenes such as Trafalgar Square in the snow and a crowded Hamleys shop window, were released for promotion of the Museum of London’s Victorian Santa’s grotto.   Here’s what Selfridges looks like today; illuminated by a giant ‘Destination Christmas’ sign, surrounded by giant silver baule baules. It’s garish glamour is worlds away from the childlike Father Christmas and Mickey Mouse which stood...

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Posted by on Oct 30, 2013 in ARTICLES

The Affordable Art Fair

The Affordable Art Fair

The Battersea Affordable Art Fair opened its doors to the public this weekend, welcoming  thousands of people. From the 24th to the 27th of October, the Battersea Evolution housed collections from more than 100 different galleries, in order for the general public to view and buy pieces all of which were priced £40 to £4,000. The AAF originates from back in 1996, when one man, Will Ramsay, decided that contemporary art was fairly out of reach for those who did not have stacks of money. He opened ‘Will’s Art Warehouse’, where he was able to offer pieces ranging from £50 to £2,500. After 3 years of increasing interest, the AAF was created and the very first show was held in Battersea in October 1999. With an impressive 10,000 people turning up, Will launched a second show in March 2001. The AAF is now a global affair, with shows being held in a variety of different cities including Amsterdam, New York, Milan and Hong Kong. The atmosphere at the AAF...

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