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Posted by on Nov 1, 2013 in ARTICLES

Miyako Ishiuchi

Miyako Ishiuchi

The ghostly image of a translucent and decaying girl’s dress, frozen in time, unsettles you. The dress, floaty and sepia-toned is all that is left of a childhood innocence, yet half of its peter pan collar and sleeves are missing: the visible and harrowing scars of Hiroshima. Japanese photographer Ishiuchi Miyako captures some of the horror of the 1945 atomic bomb in her major exhibition at the Michael Hoppen Gallery, by photographing the tattered garments that were worn by the victims. The haunting clothes, photographed against bright light, illuminates the loosening thread which holds memory, mortality, suffering and the passage of time, together. The focus is on the intricate details. In the centre of a wall, the lapels of a blue jacket in one photo stand out. Each criss-cross of the woven material, each stitch, each bleach mark, fading pocket and burn commemorates its former owner, who did not last. A baby’s tiny booties are trapped in time, and a molten watch with its ashed strap burn against an...

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Posted by on Jun 24, 2013 in ARTICLES

Riding in Hyde Park

Riding in Hyde Park

Hyde Park is one of the biggest London’s eight Royal Parks and definitely the most famous as a venue for national events since the Great Exhibition of 1851. Apart from big celebrations and concerts, Hyde Park offers several quiet places to those who love nature and sports. Rotten Row, once a meeting place for the upper class members, has now become a long route for horse riding. A 1380 metre course available to all customers and members of the local stables. Ross Nye is one of them. Set just along the Rotten Row, it’s one of the most famous stables in London since its foundation in 1965. The riding school is popular among adults and children thanks to the philosophy of the founder and the great location. Hyde Park covers over 350 acres and it’s a spacious plot for horse lovers and trainers to roam and exercise daily until 6 pm, daylight permitting. If you love horses but don’t feel comfortable riding one, you can simply enjoy take a...

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Posted by on May 30, 2013 in ARTICLES

Famous London Photographers

Famous London Photographers

As well as being a great city in its own right, London is the birthplace of a number of great photographers and in this post we’d like to highlight some of their work. Not all of them chose to create images of London – some preferred to focus on famous faces from Vivien Leigh to the Beatles, Kate Moss and beyond. Whatever their subject matter, all of them bring a uniquely London perspective and style to their work. First off, we’d like highlight the work of Bert Hardy (1913 – 1995) who was feted for his work for Picture Post magazine during the 1940s and 50s, depicting the London Blitz and post-Second World War Britain.  Hardy served in the Army Film and Photographic Unit (AFPU) during the war and participated in the D-Day Landings.  He went on to cover the Korean and Vietnam wars for Picture Post before becoming a highly successful commercial and advertising photographer. You can view a selection of Bert Hardy’s work at: http://www.photographersgallery.com Cecil Beaton...

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Posted by on May 16, 2013 in ARTICLES

London Images: The Red Phone Box

London Images: The Red Phone Box

Red phone boxes: unmistakably British and another image irrevocably linked to London.  We might not have so many of them now but those that still exist are a cherished part of the fabric of London streets, brightening up the bleakest day with their cherry-coloured livery and familiar shape. The red telephone box was originally designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott and adorns the streets of Bermuda, Gibraltar and Malta as well as former British colonies – and, of course, London. Red was used to make the phone boxes easy to spot and the kiosk came about as the result of a competition to make the rather uglier K1 telephone kiosk acceptable to the London Metropolitan Boroughs. The Fine Arts Commission elected for Gibert Scott’s design because it was in the classical style and topped by a dome reminiscent of those designed by Sir John Soane. Gilbert Scott was a trustee of the Sir John Soane’s Museum and was clearly influenced by the neo-classical architect although his original design called...

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Posted by on May 7, 2013 in ARTICLES

Quintessential London Images

Quintessential London Images

There are certain London images which are quintessential: red buses, black cabs, men in bowler hats, as well as the Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace. At Photographer London we like to capture the old and the new; to juxtapose contemporary cool with the evergreen, but this particular shot stands out because it does all of that for us and more. Take a cursory look at it and you see an old-school businessman complete with bowler hat and pinstripes alongside a guard sporting a traditional bearskin.  Look harder and you can make out the policeman toting an automatic weapon, a legacy of the war against terror that even now rages on London’s streets – albeit in typically British low-key manner – and that affected us so appallingly on July 7 2005. The London bombings, horrific as they were, hit a city that had already seen off the IRA as well as the Luftwaffe. We may have been shocked and stunned but Londoners carried on, refusing to give in...

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Posted by on Apr 29, 2013 in ARTICLES

London Images: London History In Video

London Images: London History In Video

  At Photographer London we love everything about our city, especially when we learn something new about the place we call home.  We also love our London images served up in multimedia format, including video. In the following videos focusing on the history of London you can discover how the metropolis has been shaped by disease and specifically cholera as well as pick up all kinds of esoteric information on the area known as the City of London. In the first of our two videos, one of the TED London salon talks, author Steven Johnson takes us on a “10-minute tour of The Ghost Map, his book about a cholera outbreak in 1854 London and the impact it had on science, cities and modern society.” Here’s what some people thought of his lecture along with more links to historical and contemporary facts about London: “A very informative and inspirational story about disease, science & urbanism, but it is one that also has a deep impact on human growth. Its...

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Posted by on Apr 18, 2013 in ARTICLES

London Images: Margaret Thatcher’s Funeral

London Images: Margaret Thatcher’s Funeral

  Thousands lined the streets of London today for Margaret Thatcher’s funeral and, of course, we at Photographer London were there to catch the drama as it unfolded. Except there wasn’t too much drama, only a sombre procession that wound through the city the Iron Lady presided over for more than a decade. The expected protests were low-key at best – the spectators a motley crowd of die-hard Conservatives, gawpers, immigrants, Falklands veterans and here and there the gentlemen in blazers, roses in buttonholes, who personify the stereotypical Thatcher worshipper. Most stood quietly, clapping politely as the cortege passed and sharing their thoughts on how Margaret Thatcher made Britain a better place for them. Some believed her second only to Churchill and were grateful for the chance she had given them to own their own homes. Others felt she had made their jobs more secure or had inspired them to achieve more than they would otherwise. Then there were those who felt that Thatcher had divided Britain – and...

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Posted by on Apr 9, 2013 in LINKS

Photography Sites We Love

Photography Sites We Love

We’re generous folk here at Photographer London and we’d like to share with you some of our recommendations for great photography sites that can not only teach you how to be a photographer or improve your existing skills but also catapult you into the ranks of highly-regarded professionals via contests. Our first choice is Lens Culture, the definitive site for anyone who wants to know what’s hot and happening in the world of contemporary photography. It covers the whole gamut from photojournalism to fine art and street photography in its mix of essays, reviews and analysis. It also runs international workshops, awards and events. You can find Lens Culture here: http://lensculture.com/ Next up is Kelby TV, an amazing resource that teaches all kinds of photography skills through highly professional, free video series. Among its excellent shows are Photography Tips and Tricks, Larry Becker’s Cheap Shots and Photoshop User TV. The site also runs regular contests as well as conferences for photographers and Photoshop users. Check out Kelby TV here:...

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Posted by on Apr 4, 2013 in ARTICLES

Photographs of London: The Piccadilly Love God

Photographs of London: The Piccadilly Love God

  Piccadilly Circus at 6am is a pale ghost of its bright lights, big city self. This is the witching hour – the moment the city takes a breath between the excesses of the night before and the bustle of the day ahead. It’s also one of my favourite times to photograph London as it really is: a quixotic mixture of the ancient, the modern and the outright brash. The morning I took this shot it was sleeting, that chilly, persistent amalgam of rain and snow that tints the streets and even the air a particular shade of grey. Eros – or rather, Anteros – was alone except for the odd discarded food wrapper and a broken umbrella at the base of its steps. Across the street I could see a bundle slumped in a doorway. A drunk who never made it home or, more likely, a rough sleeper. There was a time – especially around the 2012 Olympics – when Westminster tried to sanitise its streets for the...

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Posted by on Sep 14, 2012 in ARTICLES

The Shard: Opening Night

The Shard: Opening Night

This picture by PhotographerLondon founding contributor – Julian Deghy was taken on the opening night of the Shard during the laser light show on 5th July 2012. Julian set up his tripod on the brow of Primrose hill where a large crowd had gathered to enjoy the spectacle. The night was clear and dry and the visibility good. The light show started around 10pm and was planned to go on for about 30 minutes. The event had been advertised on TV as a once in a lifetime event that was not to be missed. However the crowd, who had arrived expecting to be wowed by the show, were to be bitterly disappointed as the lasers turned on and off and flashed side to side in a display that looked as though someone was sitting half way up the Shard randomly flashing a green torch. Soon cries of “this is rubbish” were emanating from the gathered throng who slowly drifted down the hill and back into the pub. Despite his...

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Posted by on Aug 22, 2012 in ARTICLES

Floral Hall: Borough Market

Floral Hall: Borough Market

This picture was taken by one of the founding contributors of PhotographerLondon.com – Julian Deghy. One night after photographing the Shard at London Bridge, Julian stopped at Borough Market for a refresher at the famous pub – “The Market Porter” which he discovered served an excellent pint of Weston’s Scrumpy cider. While he was standing outside enjoying his much welcomed ice-cold pint on this exceptionally balmy summer night he saw this scene and immediately set up his tripod and camera for this – his final shot of the night! This Picture shows The Floral Hall, which currently houses 3 restaurants – Brindisa, Wright Bros. and Roast. The Floral Hall was re-sited to Borough Market in 2003 from its original site at Covent Garden. Photographic method This photograph is not HDR – it was created manually in Photoshop and was taken on a Canon 5D mk11 (mounted on a tripod) on a 24-105mm Canon lens at ISO-500. Julian bracketed the exposure by 2 stops either way from normal to get...

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