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Posted by on Nov 5, 2014 in ARTICLES

Edward Steichen: the Condé Nast years exhibition

Edward Steichen: the Condé Nast years exhibition

The Photographers’ Gallery is hosting an exhibition on Edward Steichen’s years as a fashion photographer for Condé Nast. The exhibition is cleverly set out chronologically over three floors, and includes over 200 vintage prints as well as Steichen’s works in original context thanks to copies of Vogue and Vanity Fair. It’s easy to notice the influence of Steichen’s studies as a painter in his photographs, especially in their settings and in the way he did portraiture. Although he took inspiration from painters from the past, his pictures still look contemporary nearly a century later; it’s probably this strength that made him so famous – the talent to create beautiful, timeless shots. Some of the prints on display have not been shown to the public since the 1930s, and include designs from Patou, Schiaparelli and portraits of Greta Garbo, Frank Lloyd Wright and Fred Astaire. Edward Steichen: In High Fashion, The Condé Nast Years 1923-1937 is laid out in a clever way using, for example, the wallpaper he designed for Stehli...

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Posted by on Apr 1, 2014 in ARTICLES

Harry Callahan: The Tate Modern

Harry Callahan: The Tate Modern

The work of Harry Callahan has been residing in the Tate Modern for almost four months now, and with another two months still to go, the exhibition persists to draw in an impressive audience. It was an Ansel Adams workshop, back in 1941, which encouraged Callahan to pursue the path of professional photography. Though he received little training, Callahan is perceived as one of the most influential post-war photographers. From cityscapes to close-ups of weeds, many of Callahan’s images have a simplicity with the ability to trigger one’s mind into wondering what his inspiration could possibly have been. The exhibition displays a variety of photographic methods experimented with at the hands of Callahan. From the light abstraction of ‘Chicago’ to the carefully pieced together fashion collage, ‘Cutouts’, it’s undeniable that each of Callahan’s creations received a lot of care and attention. A whole room of the exhibition is dedicated to the photographs Callahan captured of his wife; several subtle nude shots, a stark silhouette, and many shot on location,...

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Posted by on Mar 12, 2014 in ARTICLES

2014 Kraszna-Krausz Book Awards

2014 Kraszna-Krausz Book Awards

The Kraszna-Krausz Foundation revealed on March 6th the shortlist for the Book Awards for photography and moving image books. The authors of the shortlisted books, will be competing for a £10,000 prize and the winners will be announced on April 30th at the Sony World Photography Awards gala ceremony, taking place in London. The Foundation also annouced the recipient of the Outstanding Contribution to Publishing Award, Philippa Brewer, for her dedication to the visual publishing industry. The shortlisted books will be on display at Somerset House from 1-18 May as part of the 2014 Sony World Photography Exhibition and they are: Best Photography Book Award History of Photography in China: Chinese Photographers 1844-1879 by Terry Bennett (Bernard Quaritch Ltd) The Enclave, Photographs by Richard Mosse, by Anna O’Sullivan and Jason Stearns (Aperture) Sergio Larrain: Vagabond Photographer by Agnès Sire and Gonzalo Leiva Quijada (Thames & Hudson) Best Moving Image Book Award Charles Urban: Pioneering the Non-Fiction Film in Britain and America, 1897 – 1925 by Luke McKernan (University of...

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Posted by on Mar 10, 2014 in ARTICLES

Bailey’s Stardust: National Portrait Gallery

Bailey’s Stardust: National Portrait Gallery

The iconic work of photographic legend, David Bailey, is currently being exhibited for public viewing at the National Portrait Gallery, on Trafalgar Square. More than 250 portraits, which will be displayed in the Lerner and Wolfson Galleries until June 1st, have been personally selected by David Bailey, himself, from the hundreds of subjects he has captured throughout his many decades as a professional photographer. Upon entering the exhibition, attention is immediately drawn towards the many famous faces that Bailey has photographed, beginning with an alluring 2013 portrait of Kate Moss, shamelessly promoting the pulled-through-a-hedge-backwards look. Each collection of celebrity portraits has been organised into groups, dependent upon the profession of the subjects, for example, fashion designers, actors and actresses, and singers. Some, such as the fantastically unusual portrait of Mia Farrow, date back to the 1960s. Others depict modern day icons such as Beyoncé and Noel Gallagher. The ‘Fashion Icons and Beauty’ selection was a particular highlight. Black and white shots of many designers including Tom Ford, Karl Lagerfeld...

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Posted by on Mar 10, 2014 in ARTICLES

In Kony’s Shadow: OXO Tower Wharf

In Kony’s Shadow: OXO Tower Wharf

Last week saw the two year anniversary of the release of Kony 2012, a short film made with the intention of drawing enough attention to African war criminal, Joseph Kony, that he be captured and arrested. As part of his Lord’s Resistance Army regime, Kony, who became prominent in the 1990s, was responsible for the abduction and recruitment of child soldiers in Uganda. The documentary reached more than 100 million views in just six days. Even Invisible Children Inc, who created the short film, could not have anticipated the rate at which it would spread across the internet. In order to mark the anniversary, on March 5th, Christian Aid opened In Kony’s Shadow, a photographic exhibition in the ground floor gallery at the OXO Tower Wharf, dedicated to those who survived Kony’s reign of terror. Though the exhibition is small, it can easily have a big impact on those viewing it. Each portrait photograph is accompanied by a survivor’s story, offering an insight into the lives of people who...

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Posted by on Feb 19, 2014 in ARTICLES

William Eggleston at the Tate

William Eggleston at the Tate

Tate Modern is temporarily hosting works of one of the most revolutionary photographers of the 1970s, William Eggleston. An entire room is dedicated to Eggleston’s works, and as soon as you enter, you can’t help but notice one thing: colours. In fact, colours are his trademark: Eggleston started to experiment with them  in the 1960s, when coloured prints were associated with advertising companies, whereas Art photographers only shot in black and white. His photography was revolutionary not only for the bright colours, but also because instead of capturing the right moment, he captured daily life, something other photographers didn’t look at. Most of his photographs were shot in his hometown in Tennessee, and feature mostly the banal, ordinary life in America in the ‘70s. His images don’t usually feature people, but still life. There would be nothing interesting in a toilet with hair rollers on top, however the choice of contrasting colours, pink and yellow, is what makes you look at the picture and think it’s interesting. Likewise, the...

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Posted by on Jan 31, 2014 in ARTICLES

Behind The Mask

Behind The Mask

Somerset House has temporarily become home to a fantastic exhibition displaying portrait images of one hundred actors and actresses who have won or been nominated for BAFTA awards over the last 60 years. ‘Behind the Mask’ is a beautiful and thought-provoking collection of photographs captured by Andy Gotts MBE, who has specialised in portrait photography for 23 years. The exhibition is wonderfully extensive, dominating the entire West Wing of Somerset House. The collection includes many subjects known to millions of people across the world, including Robert De Niro, Sir Anthony Hopkins, Dame Helen Mirren and Helena Bonham-Carter. Each image was shot close up, creating stark appearances and allowing visitors to the exhibition an experience which feels very much like meeting the famous figures face-to-face. The project has taken over two years to create. When visiting, I couldn’t help but wonder what motivated Andy Gotts into creating such a large exhibition; he travelled far and wide to capture the images, making the process very time consuming. I asked Andy what...

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Posted by on Dec 24, 2013 in ARTICLES

Destination Christmas in  London!

Destination Christmas in London!

The festive period is perhaps the best time of year to visit the capital city. From the magical Winter Wonderland that dominates Hyde Park to the dazzling decorative lights down Oxford Street, there’s no denying that London has Christmas spirit. And judging by the photographs recently released by the Museum of London, the Christmas spirit isn’t something to have arrived in recent years. This is a festive Selfridges 60 years ago. The photograph is one of a collection of images released by the Museum of London, captured by Henry Grant, depicting Christmas in the capital in the 1950s and 1960s. This snap, along with 11 others, showing scenes such as Trafalgar Square in the snow and a crowded Hamleys shop window, were released for promotion of the Museum of London’s Victorian Santa’s grotto.   Here’s what Selfridges looks like today; illuminated by a giant ‘Destination Christmas’ sign, surrounded by giant silver baule baules. It’s garish glamour is worlds away from the childlike Father Christmas and Mickey Mouse which stood...

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Posted by on Nov 1, 2013 in ARTICLES

Miyako Ishiuchi

Miyako Ishiuchi

The ghostly image of a translucent and decaying girl’s dress, frozen in time, unsettles you. The dress, floaty and sepia-toned is all that is left of a childhood innocence, yet half of its peter pan collar and sleeves are missing: the visible and harrowing scars of Hiroshima. Japanese photographer Ishiuchi Miyako captures some of the horror of the 1945 atomic bomb in her major exhibition at the Michael Hoppen Gallery, by photographing the tattered garments that were worn by the victims. The haunting clothes, photographed against bright light, illuminates the loosening thread which holds memory, mortality, suffering and the passage of time, together. The focus is on the intricate details. In the centre of a wall, the lapels of a blue jacket in one photo stand out. Each criss-cross of the woven material, each stitch, each bleach mark, fading pocket and burn commemorates its former owner, who did not last. A baby’s tiny booties are trapped in time, and a molten watch with its ashed strap burn against an...

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Posted by on Oct 30, 2013 in ARTICLES

The Affordable Art Fair

The Affordable Art Fair

The Battersea Affordable Art Fair opened its doors to the public this weekend, welcoming  thousands of people. From the 24th to the 27th of October, the Battersea Evolution housed collections from more than 100 different galleries, in order for the general public to view and buy pieces all of which were priced £40 to £4,000. The AAF originates from back in 1996, when one man, Will Ramsay, decided that contemporary art was fairly out of reach for those who did not have stacks of money. He opened ‘Will’s Art Warehouse’, where he was able to offer pieces ranging from £50 to £2,500. After 3 years of increasing interest, the AAF was created and the very first show was held in Battersea in October 1999. With an impressive 10,000 people turning up, Will launched a second show in March 2001. The AAF is now a global affair, with shows being held in a variety of different cities including Amsterdam, New York, Milan and Hong Kong. The atmosphere at the AAF...

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Posted by on Oct 25, 2013 in ARTICLES

Spitalfields Market

Spitalfields Market

How many people have seen their own town or city through the eyes of a tourist? If you live somewhere, you tend not to visit it and explore it as a tourist would. I only saw the real Manchester once my family had moved away and I returned almost ten years later. My parents saw more of Glasgow once they moved away from the suburbs. Because I was not born a Londoner, I make a conscious effort to explore the city. When my boyfriend moved down with me over two years ago, having grown up in The Midlands, he wanted to see the sights. Whenever we had free time together, we would visit places such as Westminster Abbey, The Tower of London and Kew Gardens to name a few. Having him there has given me a good excuse to go exploring my own city. Last week when we had relatives from Massachusetts stay with us for a week, we tried to cram in as much sightseeing as possible. When...

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Posted by on Oct 24, 2013 in ARTICLES

A PEEK TO THE WORLD OF ‘JR’ AND THE ‘INSIDE OUT PROJECT’.

A PEEK TO THE WORLD OF ‘JR’ AND THE ‘INSIDE OUT PROJECT’.

It was one of those days when you feel like closing the blinds, shutting the door of your room and sitting in all day on the bed with a cup of hot chocolate.  Thank God  we have the weekends for doing that something we call ‘nothing’. So I turned my laptop on and searched for a  documentary to watch. One of them, ‘Women are heroes’ caught my attention. The meaning behind the title was something I was willing to find out. I watched a movie which ended within  the speed of  light. I became glued to the sofa like the images of the women you see on gigantic sized posters, that have been glued in the most unexpected places like abandoned buildings of Favela in Brazilian Rio, roofs of  Kibera slums in Kenya, walls of the buildings in Delhi, Liberia, Cambodia and Sudan. The women who are brave enough to expose their personal life stories and faces to the world are heroines of the movie. They have proved their...

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Posted by on Oct 10, 2013 in ARTICLES

Mobile Phones and Danny Elfman

Mobile Phones and Danny Elfman

When I look back through my childhood, I realise how having a mobile phone at that age would have benefited me a great deal – there was rarely a moment when I was inside the house. I would be out every night on my bicycle or my scooter with a few friends and we would explore the local area. We were only meant to stay on our cul-de-sac, however most summer evenings, we’d be down playing in a stream by the tennis courts, outside of the set boundaries. There were a few times where we would get caught, cycling down the dual-carriageway or down the main road into town, and then would be escorted back by a family friend of one of my play-mates back to the house. That was where I awaited the dreaded “Just you wait until your father gets home”. If I had a mobile phone, I would never be late home – I hardly wore a watch – if my parents required me home early,...

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Posted by on Oct 9, 2013 in ARTICLES

Red Phone Boxes at Night

Red Phone Boxes at Night

Shot at night using a two second exposure on a 70-200 Cannon zoom lens at 80mm focal length, this image displays the rich bold red of London’s famous telephone boxes. The photograph was taken at Parliament Square looking down Whitehall. The last phone box in the distance is by the entrance to Downing Street. London’s telephone boxes used to be renowned for their collection of call girl’s numbers displayed in the windows and by the telephone receivers, not to mention the damp odours that used to linger inside. However, situated at the foot of the Prime Minister’s residence, the examples in Whitehall are amongst the cleanest of London’s remaining hundred phone boxes. The original red phone box was designed by English architect, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott who decided on the vibrant red colour so that they were easy to spot. There have been various designs of the red boxed phone booth. While few red phone boxes remain, modernised versions with clear panels replaced them all around the country. This...

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Posted by on Oct 2, 2013 in ARTICLES

London’s Southbank

London’s Southbank

It has been over 60 years since the Festival of Britain was opened by King George, and since then, the scenery of London’s Southbank has been ever changing. The festival took place six years after the end of World War II and was built to celebrate all things British in science, design and technology, in order to boost the economy and morale. Despite Churchill’s damning of the event as “socialist propaganda”, leading to the destruction of the site once he regained power, the Festival of Britain saw over 10 million visitors during the summer of 1951. Nowadays, the Royal Festival Hall, part of The Southbank Centre, hosts both national and international artists. This is the home of the London Philharmonic Orchestra, the Philharmonic Orchestra along with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. If classical music isn’t your thing, for example, the hall hosts Sir Alex Ferguson on the 1st November, discussing his life and career. Whilst the site has moved on from the morale-boosting post-war era, this path...

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Posted by on Oct 1, 2013 in ARTICLES

Death Knell for Earls Court

Death Knell for Earls Court

So it’s finally happened: last week, after years of deliberation, tactical vagueness and not a little controversy, Hammersmith & Fulham Council announced they had given the thumbs-up to property developer CapCo’s plans for the area around Earl’s Court. The project, which will take some twenty years to complete and stands to net CapCo around £8bn, involves bulldozing two housing estates, a major TfL depot and, of course, the two great exhibition halls to make way for an enormous luxury housing and shopping complex. The local residents’ association is not unjustifiably up in arms, and the building work will cause major disruption to transport across West London. I have some pretty well-defined reservations myself- not least because my kitchen window, which I’m periodically glancing out of as I write this, looks directly over the development site. From here, I can see the original Art Deco exhibition centre and the ungainly postmodern vaudeville of its sister building, opened in 1991- it’s hardly picturesque, but neither is it unpleasant. Thrown into the...

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Posted by on Sep 30, 2013 in ARTICLES

The Endless Stairs

The Endless Stairs

In front of The Tate Modern on Southbank, are some stairs. Whilst this may seem not out of the ordinary, it is in fact a temporary art installation by Zurich’s dRMM architects, called Endless Stairs. This artwork, installed in line with 2013 The London Design Festival, is interactive. Everyone is encouraged to climb up it as they please. Whilst it can be enjoyed as a simple climbing frame, dRMM wanted to draw comparisons between the Endless Stairs and the work of Escher. Alex de Rijke in their ‘making-of’ video says “Escher’s inspiration was something that drove us to make a staircase that was not possible necessarily to understand as a simple linear composition”. This simple piece is designed to be fun and also to view the surroundings from different angles. From the top of the Endless Stairs at The Tate Modern, you can see along the river towards the construction in the city and across to the dome of St Pauls. These viewpoints provide an endless number of unique...

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Posted by on Sep 11, 2013 in ARTICLES

Black Market Clash, Don’t Miss The Real London Calling!

Black Market Clash, Don’t Miss The Real London Calling!

Black Market Clash opens for two weeks only from the 7th of September. The first pop-up store at 75, Berwick Street in Soho has now become a punk sanctuary, celebrating the release of The Clash Hits Back, the 2-disc best of collection from the British band. The store, art directed by the band and Robert Gordon McHarg III, is certainly unmissable. The guy at the door, wearing a leather jacket (any wonder?), introduces you to the exhibition, split into different sections. On the ground floor, guitars, vinyls and an artwork created especially for the store. Several shelves displaying supercolourful consumer goods, from cereal packs to laundry soap, stamped with black Clash mark. Downstairs, never-before-seen pictures, memorabilia and manuscripts. And of course, the legendary bass Paul Simonon smashed on the iconic London Calling cover of which you’ll surely want to take a picture. Moreover, each week a selected group of 10 people per session can practise some of the most famous band’s tracks with Fender’s product specialists. Some may say...

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Posted by on Sep 2, 2013 in ARTICLES

Hard Times For Nelson & Co.: A Giant, Blue Cock Conquers Trafalgar Square

Hard Times For Nelson & Co.: A Giant, Blue Cock Conquers Trafalgar Square

“Ladies and gentlemen, here it is, the big blue … bird.” With a key pause, London mayor Boris Johnson introduced the new statue erected in Trafalgar Square on July 25. Nobody could have ever guessed that the gap on the fourth plinth, originally designed for an equestrian statue depicting William IV, would have been filled with a blue cock, with all the double entendres that it implies. Hahn/Cock is the title of the sculpture which now sits in the spotlight on the plinth in the north-west corner of the square. The artist, Katharina Fritsch, was selected among others by the Fourth Plinth Commissioning Group. The German scluptress won the competition for a temporary statue with a provocative artwork. The rooster represents regeneration and strength, but there’s more here than meets the eye. As the national symbol of France, the cockerel could have created a querelle, but Fritsch admitted that she realized that only after having registered the idea. Her provocation is something different. In effect, the humourous concept for...

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Posted by on Aug 14, 2013 in ARTICLES

“Stands Alone”, A Photo Exhibition Brings Together Our Solitudes

“Stands Alone”, A Photo Exhibition Brings Together Our Solitudes

Cosy, relaxed, warm, comfortable, surreal, a little pretentious? How do you imagine living in the former Arsenal Football stadium would be? Whether you are an Arsenal fan or not, the “Stands Alone” photography exhibition at the Geffrye Museum in Shoreditch is a unique opportunity to have a journey into the daily life of a newborn community in a newly built residential complex: the Highbury Stadium Square, located at the former stadium in North London. 32 out of 700 residents were willing to collaborate with the talented Simone Novotny. Graduated in Photography and International Development, she worked with Amnesty International, PhotoVoice, Red Cross and Save the Children. “Stands Alone” is a good chance to become familiar with her talent in raising awareness on social issues and giving voice to common people. Thanks to a collage of photographic portraits, audio and written depositions by the residents, walking among the panels makes you feel closer to these people, their feelings, thoughts, emotions, hopes and habits: from the passionate fan who realized a...

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Posted by on Jul 26, 2013 in ARTICLES

A Capsule With A View

A Capsule With A View

Observation structures are common tourist attractions in big cities around the world. New York’s Empire State Building, Chicago’s Sears Tower, Toronto’s CN Tower, and Taipei’s Taipei 101 – the list goes on – But how many cities can boast that their observation structure is a giant Ferris wheel? A few, maybe. But one thing’s sure. There’s no other place like the London Eye which has become such a magnet for photographers in so little time. Opened in 2000, the London Eye stands 442 feet tall and is located on the South Bank of the river. Originally called The Millennium Wheel, architects created the Eye to celebrate the dawn of the year 2000. Why a Ferris wheel? The turning of the wheel was meant to represent the turning of the century. It is the brainchild of David Marks and Julia Barfield, of Marks Barfield, a husband and wife team of architects. A 1993 competition organized by the Sunday Times newspaper called for ideas for a monument to mark the upcoming...

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Posted by on Jul 11, 2013 in ARTICLES

A Real Waterbed In The Heart Of The City

A Real Waterbed In The Heart Of The City

On the waterways in London there are a collection of floating villages inside the city, a world away from the chaos of London. Everyday there are things going on in places such as the one in this picture, on the Thames at Hammersmith. What’s impressive is that increasingly people decide to go and live on boats. According to the Residential Boat Owners Association, 15000 people in Great Britain live on boats and hundreds of them are in London. Again, in many cases the reason why people make this decision is the need to escape the city while still being part of it. It’s all about being in contact with nature and yet having a great social life. Although many of them are often on the move, floating people normally know each other well and have a strong sense of local community. Besides, people living on boats are usually friendly and sociable, eager to talk about their own experience and share tips and practical knowledge on their peculiar lifestyle. That’s...

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Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 in ARTICLES

The Genesis Exhibition, Back To The Origin In Black And White

The Genesis Exhibition, Back To The Origin In Black And White

Sebastião Salgado, educated in politics and a qualified economist, took up photography at the age of 26, while his wife Lélia was working as an architect in Paris and purchased a camera to photograph apartments. Had Salgado not looked through the viewfinder when he picked up his wife’s camera, he’d probably still be an economist today. He reflects back on this life changing moment: “When I saw through a camera for the first time, I saw another way to see the world. I fell in love.” Since swapping economics for photography in 1973, Salgado shared global awareness of social issues as result of spreading industrialisation through his immense photographic projects Other Americas, Workers and Migrations, captured in his trademark monochrome photography. He recalls: “I lived totally inside photography, doing long term projects.” Each of the three major works referred to above took Salgado several years to complete. The eight years spent on Genesis allowed Salgado to get to know his subjects and their environment they lived or worked in....

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Posted by on Jul 8, 2013 in ARTICLES

Photography Ethics: When Are Our Rights Wrong?

Photography Ethics: When Are Our Rights Wrong?

Just because we may have the right to take a picture of someone, does that morally make it ok? It’s hard to say, and as you might expect opinions will differ from person to person. In the UK the gist of the law in relation to taking pictures, DSLRs and iPhones alike, is you can take pictures of whatever you want as long as you’re standing within a public place, with the exception of a few sensitive buildings, like the Ministry of Defence or the MI6 headquarter. If you want to take a picture of the queue at Ministry of Sound however, you are fine to do just that. That’s what the law provides for, but what about morals? What if you take a picture of someone digging their nose when they thought no one was watching, especially whit the 300mm lens whilst you mutter “Gotcha!” as you press the shutter? Or maybe the subject may have had something confidential in their hand that they were about to conceal....

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Posted by on Jul 3, 2013 in ARTICLES

Challenge Gravity Without Superpowers!

Challenge Gravity Without Superpowers!

A couple holding hands standing on the ledge of a Victorian terraced house. A fearless man sitting on the window sill of the same building. A child scaling the façade as easily as only Spiderman would do. The location is not a Hollywood studio and we’re not talking about the next great blockbuster movie with a complicated plot. We’re in 1-7 Ashwin Street, North-East London, a residential area bombed during World War II. The detailed façade lies on the ground with a mirrored surface positioned overhead. This structure, at a 45-degree angle, creates the illusion of being suspended. The building, similar to the original houses of the block, is an installation created by the Argentinian artist Leandro Erlich, master of optical tricks, already known for his fake swimming pool at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan. Once again, Erlich’s aim is to explore reality beyond its limits, turning everyday situations into extraordinary experiences accessible to everybody. That’s the case of Dalston House, where a patient...

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Posted by on Jun 27, 2013 in ARTICLES

A Walk To The End Of The River

A Walk To The End Of The River

The Museum of London Docklands has plenty of tales to share with its visitors. Facing the West India Docks in Canary Wharf, it is certainly the best venue for this amazing exhibition exploring the Estuary through the works of 12 contemporary artists. The hall is a simple labyrinth of wooden floors and light panels, filled up with a distant sound of waves. It offers a full immersion into the landscapes, history and tales of the river. The Estuary plays the main role here. An industrialised, decayed, nostalgic and overlooked space is protagonist of several paintings, film-making and photographic works in an exhibition open until the 27th of October. Human intervention on the landscape is one of the main topics. Grey industrial buildings, concrete and garbage are threats to the environment recorded by different artists who become real storytellers. Peter Marshall’s series of photographs “Thames Gateway” captures incinerators, housing estates and motorways with wide angle lens; similarly, Jock Mcfadyen’s canvas, “Purfleet from Dracula’s Garden”, portrays panoramic views of roads and...

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Posted by on Jun 26, 2013 in ARTICLES

Ray of light: When Design Meets Photography

Ray of light: When Design Meets Photography

Introducing summer with a selection of light sculptures. That’s FREQ., a photo exhibition that takes its subjects from architectural installations where light is the real protagonist. The exhibition is staged at the Hoxton Gallery, a former Victorian railway arch which offers a dark, dreamlike atmosphere. The exhibition is the result of the collaboration between the design studio Haberdashery and photographer Julian Abrams, both interested in exploring light possibilities at their finest. The former is a creative studio of artists, engineers and image creators which is constantly exploring new conjunctions. The latter is a famous photographer who specialises in architectural work. It seems quite natural to start a crossover between design and photography, then. The co-working team used LEDs and polished stainless steel for 5 installations. One of them is ArcFrequency, an interactive sculpture with a porthole through which people could take a look at the interior. Light changes at a different pace and turn into several shades and shapes. These patterns have been captured in 14 photographic prints, mostly named...

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Posted by on Jun 24, 2013 in ARTICLES

Riding in Hyde Park

Riding in Hyde Park

Hyde Park is one of the biggest London’s eight Royal Parks and definitely the most famous as a venue for national events since the Great Exhibition of 1851. Apart from big celebrations and concerts, Hyde Park offers several quiet places to those who love nature and sports. Rotten Row, once a meeting place for the upper class members, has now become a long route for horse riding. A 1380 metre course available to all customers and members of the local stables. Ross Nye is one of them. Set just along the Rotten Row, it’s one of the most famous stables in London since its foundation in 1965. The riding school is popular among adults and children thanks to the philosophy of the founder and the great location. Hyde Park covers over 350 acres and it’s a spacious plot for horse lovers and trainers to roam and exercise daily until 6 pm, daylight permitting. If you love horses but don’t feel comfortable riding one, you can simply enjoy take a...

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Posted by on Jun 24, 2013 in ARTICLES

Visions of the Universe – Interplanetary Paparazzi

Visions of the Universe – Interplanetary Paparazzi

From the famous “Earthrise” photo where astronauts captured the Earth rising over the surface of the moon, to images of Saturn captured by NASA’s Cassini orbit, a new exhibition, Visions of the Universe, shows off some of the most spectacular space photography of all time. Like interplanetary paparazzi, space scientists including the Astronomer Royal Sir Martin Rees, Wolfgang Tillmans, (the late) Sir Patrick Moore have curated all the sections. The exhibition includes contributions and insights from prominent figures in the world of astronomy, including scientists Dr Chris Lintott and Dr Lucie Green from the BBC’s The Sky at Night, Mars explorer Professor Sanjeev Gupta of Imperial College, space scientist Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock, astro-photographer Dr David Malin and Baron Rees of Ludlow, the Astronomer Royal. Visions of the Universe at the National Maritime Museum, shows how we have created imagary of the heavens over the centuries, from the earliest drawings to photographs taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and the very latest footage from the Mars Curiosity rover. This exhibition...

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Posted by on Jun 19, 2013 in ARTICLES

The Gao Brothers: Dualities from China

The Gao Brothers: Dualities from China

On 5 June, the Hua Gallery, a beautiful small space by the river at Battersea that specializes in Chinese art, has become the home to “Between Spiritual and Material Spaces: the Photographic World of the Gao Brothers”. The exhibition is the Brothers’ first in London, and features a collection of photographs which discuss the relationship between individuals and their place within society. As the Gao Brothers come from a generation which has experienced the Cultural Revolution and the Chinese Avant-Garde, their work was expected to be controversial. Instead of shocking images, they express their background and their beliefs through very serene photographs, full of details and hidden emotions. There is also a lot of reflection about dualities: bodies against buildings, natural versus artificial, materiality against spirituality, personal versus collective. As this exhibition is a selection of the artists’ best pictures from their wider body of work, it may feel a little disconnected when seen as a whole. Nevertheless, it is possible to distinguish their influences and their recurrent motifs...

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Posted by on Jun 14, 2013 in ARTICLES

Camden – The home of alternative London

Camden – The home of alternative London

Far from the splendour of the Royal palaces and the exclusive shopping streets, Camden Town should be the first point of call for anyone wanting to experience the alternative side of London. Parts of old Camden are indeed charming, but the contemporary feel of Camden is raw, rugged, raunchy and dangerous. But always exciting! Since the 1980s Camden Town, has become a magnet for every kind of London subculture. Be it Punk, Goth, Hippie, Trans or Emo, it can all be found here.  By day, Camden is best known as home to several large labyrinthine open-air markets (weekends) comprising of independent stallholders, selling whacky, wild and unusual products with everything ranging from Artichokes to a zebra print onesie. A great place to spot new young designers selling gifts, vintage clothing, handmade and secondhand furniture, futuristic, cyberpunk, gothic, burlesque and fetish ware- it’s all available here. The market is also renowned for its delicious street food. There’s a global cuisine on offer here – choose from vegetarian specialities to hearty...

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Posted by on Jun 14, 2013 in ARTICLES

Tower Bridge at Dusk

Tower Bridge at Dusk

Of all London’s landmarks, surely Tower Bridge is one of the most internationally recognisable? Opened for business in 1894 after eight years of construction(1886–1894). Originally the bridge had two walkways linking the top of each tower which were open to the public. However, in 1910 they were closed to stop them being used by prostitutes and petty criminals.  They were reopened in 1982 and now only tourists can be found there. Because of the light in this image, taken by photographer Laina Watt, I am reminded of classic film noirs of the 1940s and 50s and wouldn’t be too surprised to see Humphrey Bogart to walk into view any second with his trademark hat and mac. As this is a black and white shot, you could say that it reflects London and its history. The greyness may remind viewers of a grim and feared past, when London was rife with poverty and disease. The industrial revolution had plagued the capital with a thick smog which turned everything a nasty...

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Posted by on Jun 14, 2013 in ARTICLES

Leadenhall Market

Leadenhall Market

At Leadenhall Market we have a classic example of Victorian architecture. For me this place is especially heart-warming as I am a keen fan of “Steampunk” art. For those of you who don’t know what I mean, Steampunk is a contemporary art subculture based entirely in anachronistic Victorian science fiction and fantasy, which is founded on aesthetics from that period. Fashion, music, film and literature make up the Steampunk repertoire, and beautiful architecture like Leadenhall is amongst the best accomplice for such a movement. The wide variety of colours and the gothic fonts used in the signs at Leadenhall give a true image of the past, that make you feel as if you’ve stepped back into the nineteenth century.  As one of the oldest markets in Britain, Leadenhall righjtfully deserves its position as a place where contemporary society can embrace the past in London’s ever changing environment. One thing I really like in this image, is the light reflected on the cobbled ground. This image was taken after a...

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Posted by on Jun 6, 2013 in ARTICLES

Iconic London Underground: A History

Iconic London Underground: A History

This year the London Underground celebrates it’s 150th birthday. Here at Photographer London we wanted to share some of the iconic images we adore. Originally touted nobly as a way to relieve the slums of their impoverished and cramped inhabitants. The plan was to make commuter living a reality for the poor. Nobody cared! Then after a few years the plan was re-touted as an essential tool to keep London prosperous. Bingo! With the backers in place the first line was built barely below the street surface. Steam trains ran frequently and the project was deemed a great success.As public demand grew, more enterprising investors clubbed together to set up rival lines all over the city. The network was born.   The famous London Underground map and the iconic logo appeared respectively in 1931 and 1933. The logo officially known as a Roundel had been around since 1905 and had gradually evolved in design and importance. Now it is an internationally recognised symbol for the city. The map was designed by Harry...

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Posted by on May 30, 2013 in ARTICLES

Famous London Photographers

Famous London Photographers

As well as being a great city in its own right, London is the birthplace of a number of great photographers and in this post we’d like to highlight some of their work. Not all of them chose to create images of London – some preferred to focus on famous faces from Vivien Leigh to the Beatles, Kate Moss and beyond. Whatever their subject matter, all of them bring a uniquely London perspective and style to their work. First off, we’d like highlight the work of Bert Hardy (1913 – 1995) who was feted for his work for Picture Post magazine during the 1940s and 50s, depicting the London Blitz and post-Second World War Britain.  Hardy served in the Army Film and Photographic Unit (AFPU) during the war and participated in the D-Day Landings.  He went on to cover the Korean and Vietnam wars for Picture Post before becoming a highly successful commercial and advertising photographer. You can view a selection of Bert Hardy’s work at: http://www.photographersgallery.com Cecil Beaton...

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Posted by on May 28, 2013 in ARTICLES

An Evening With Sebastião Salgado

An Evening With Sebastião Salgado

Last Monday (20th of May), the internationally renowned photographer Sebastião Salgado came to London for a brief talk about his new project, “Genesis”. The event was hosted by the National History Museum, which will be home for the exhibition until September 8, and gathered around 400 people. Sebastião greeted everybody around 7.30 with a polite attitude and a timid smile. He has a strong accent and apologizes for it – but he did not even need to worry, for the audience was absolutely avid for the stories behind his pictures. After thanking his team, Mirella Ricciardi – a Quenian photographer who has inspired him to start and is there watching him talk – and his wife, Lélia – who has supported his work and helped him all along –, he finally begins talking about his career. Salgado is simple, humble and extremely talented. He explains everything: how he traded his job in Economy for a brand new start in Photography, how his childhood in Brazil has influenced him on...

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Posted by on May 23, 2013 in ARTICLES

John Riddy: Palermo

John Riddy: Palermo

John Riddy, a prominent figure in contemporary British photography, tells timeless tales of contrasts and transfiguration through his pictures taken around the world: light and dark, old and modern, decadent and renewed, natural and urban. His most recent stage has been Palermo, the Sicilian capital, where he has spent three years of roaming and contemplation since 2011. From the marble of the Palazzo delle Poste to the wet asphalt of the Vucciria; from the open sea in Caletta San Erasmo, to the walled-in windows over Panficio Morello; from the grace surrounding the centuries-old trees in Piazza Marina, to the rotten builidings in Via della Loggia. Riddy lays his eyes on the overlooked corners of a gem nestled in the extreme South of Italy and gives them a remote voice that moves and slightly disturbs the viewer. Spaces well-known for their brilliant colours, lively markets and people, are here silenced almost violently by the nostalgic game of black and white and the elimination of the human figure. Palermo takes on the appearance of a static memory, whose beauty is both unpretentious and overwhelming at the same...

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Posted by on May 19, 2013 in ARTICLES

Chris Levine: Light 3.142

Chris Levine: Light 3.142

  17th May -15th June 2013 The Fine Art Society, 148 New Bond Street, is showing the first major London solo exhibition of the work of Chris Levine: an immersive exhibition where light plays the key role. About The Artist  Chris Levine is a name that’s fast becoming synonymous with cutting-edge, holographic digital artworks that take in their sway everything from a giant flickering hologram of Grace Jones to eerie portraits of The Queen. Born in 1972 in Ontario, now living and working in Northamptonshire, Chris Levine is a light artist who works across mediums in pursuit of a sensory and perceptive experience through his use of image, light and form. Levine rose to prominence when he created a series of holographic portraits of the Queen in 2007. These portraits of the most well known woman in the world, combine traditional, formal gravitas with the most modern technique in photography. Unlike any previous portrait of her Majesty, they are truly unique and formed both the opening and closing pieces...

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Posted by on May 16, 2013 in ARTICLES

London Images: The Red Phone Box

London Images: The Red Phone Box

Red phone boxes: unmistakably British and another image irrevocably linked to London.  We might not have so many of them now but those that still exist are a cherished part of the fabric of London streets, brightening up the bleakest day with their cherry-coloured livery and familiar shape. The red telephone box was originally designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott and adorns the streets of Bermuda, Gibraltar and Malta as well as former British colonies – and, of course, London. Red was used to make the phone boxes easy to spot and the kiosk came about as the result of a competition to make the rather uglier K1 telephone kiosk acceptable to the London Metropolitan Boroughs. The Fine Arts Commission elected for Gibert Scott’s design because it was in the classical style and topped by a dome reminiscent of those designed by Sir John Soane. Gilbert Scott was a trustee of the Sir John Soane’s Museum and was clearly influenced by the neo-classical architect although his original design called...

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Posted by on May 7, 2013 in ARTICLES

Quintessential London Images

Quintessential London Images

There are certain London images which are quintessential: red buses, black cabs, men in bowler hats, as well as the Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace. At Photographer London we like to capture the old and the new; to juxtapose contemporary cool with the evergreen, but this particular shot stands out because it does all of that for us and more. Take a cursory look at it and you see an old-school businessman complete with bowler hat and pinstripes alongside a guard sporting a traditional bearskin.  Look harder and you can make out the policeman toting an automatic weapon, a legacy of the war against terror that even now rages on London’s streets – albeit in typically British low-key manner – and that affected us so appallingly on July 7 2005. The London bombings, horrific as they were, hit a city that had already seen off the IRA as well as the Luftwaffe. We may have been shocked and stunned but Londoners carried on, refusing to give in...

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Posted by on Apr 29, 2013 in ARTICLES

London Images: London History In Video

London Images: London History In Video

  At Photographer London we love everything about our city, especially when we learn something new about the place we call home.  We also love our London images served up in multimedia format, including video. In the following videos focusing on the history of London you can discover how the metropolis has been shaped by disease and specifically cholera as well as pick up all kinds of esoteric information on the area known as the City of London. In the first of our two videos, one of the TED London salon talks, author Steven Johnson takes us on a “10-minute tour of The Ghost Map, his book about a cholera outbreak in 1854 London and the impact it had on science, cities and modern society.” Here’s what some people thought of his lecture along with more links to historical and contemporary facts about London: “A very informative and inspirational story about disease, science & urbanism, but it is one that also has a deep impact on human growth. Its...

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Posted by on Apr 18, 2013 in ARTICLES

London Images: Margaret Thatcher’s Funeral

London Images: Margaret Thatcher’s Funeral

  Thousands lined the streets of London today for Margaret Thatcher’s funeral and, of course, we at Photographer London were there to catch the drama as it unfolded. Except there wasn’t too much drama, only a sombre procession that wound through the city the Iron Lady presided over for more than a decade. The expected protests were low-key at best – the spectators a motley crowd of die-hard Conservatives, gawpers, immigrants, Falklands veterans and here and there the gentlemen in blazers, roses in buttonholes, who personify the stereotypical Thatcher worshipper. Most stood quietly, clapping politely as the cortege passed and sharing their thoughts on how Margaret Thatcher made Britain a better place for them. Some believed her second only to Churchill and were grateful for the chance she had given them to own their own homes. Others felt she had made their jobs more secure or had inspired them to achieve more than they would otherwise. Then there were those who felt that Thatcher had divided Britain – and...

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Posted by on Apr 4, 2013 in ARTICLES

Photographs of London: The Piccadilly Love God

Photographs of London: The Piccadilly Love God

  Piccadilly Circus at 6am is a pale ghost of its bright lights, big city self. This is the witching hour – the moment the city takes a breath between the excesses of the night before and the bustle of the day ahead. It’s also one of my favourite times to photograph London as it really is: a quixotic mixture of the ancient, the modern and the outright brash. The morning I took this shot it was sleeting, that chilly, persistent amalgam of rain and snow that tints the streets and even the air a particular shade of grey. Eros – or rather, Anteros – was alone except for the odd discarded food wrapper and a broken umbrella at the base of its steps. Across the street I could see a bundle slumped in a doorway. A drunk who never made it home or, more likely, a rough sleeper. There was a time – especially around the 2012 Olympics – when Westminster tried to sanitise its streets for the...

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Posted by on Sep 14, 2012 in ARTICLES

The Shard: Opening Night

The Shard: Opening Night

This picture by PhotographerLondon founding contributor – Julian Deghy was taken on the opening night of the Shard during the laser light show on 5th July 2012. Julian set up his tripod on the brow of Primrose hill where a large crowd had gathered to enjoy the spectacle. The night was clear and dry and the visibility good. The light show started around 10pm and was planned to go on for about 30 minutes. The event had been advertised on TV as a once in a lifetime event that was not to be missed. However the crowd, who had arrived expecting to be wowed by the show, were to be bitterly disappointed as the lasers turned on and off and flashed side to side in a display that looked as though someone was sitting half way up the Shard randomly flashing a green torch. Soon cries of “this is rubbish” were emanating from the gathered throng who slowly drifted down the hill and back into the pub. Despite his...

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Posted by on Aug 22, 2012 in ARTICLES

Floral Hall: Borough Market

Floral Hall: Borough Market

This picture was taken by one of the founding contributors of PhotographerLondon.com – Julian Deghy. One night after photographing the Shard at London Bridge, Julian stopped at Borough Market for a refresher at the famous pub – “The Market Porter” which he discovered served an excellent pint of Weston’s Scrumpy cider. While he was standing outside enjoying his much welcomed ice-cold pint on this exceptionally balmy summer night he saw this scene and immediately set up his tripod and camera for this – his final shot of the night! This Picture shows The Floral Hall, which currently houses 3 restaurants – Brindisa, Wright Bros. and Roast. The Floral Hall was re-sited to Borough Market in 2003 from its original site at Covent Garden. Photographic method This photograph is not HDR – it was created manually in Photoshop and was taken on a Canon 5D mk11 (mounted on a tripod) on a 24-105mm Canon lens at ISO-500. Julian bracketed the exposure by 2 stops either way from normal to get...

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