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Posted by on Nov 5, 2014 in ARTICLES

Edward Steichen: the Condé Nast years exhibition

Edward Steichen: the Condé Nast years exhibition

The Photographers’ Gallery is hosting an exhibition on Edward Steichen’s years as a fashion photographer for Condé Nast. The exhibition is cleverly set out chronologically over three floors, and includes over 200 vintage prints as well as Steichen’s works in original context thanks to copies of Vogue and Vanity Fair. It’s easy to notice the influence of Steichen’s studies as a painter in his photographs, especially in their settings and in the way he did portraiture. Although he took inspiration from painters from the past, his pictures still look contemporary nearly a century later; it’s probably this strength that made him so famous – the talent to create beautiful, timeless shots. Some of the prints on display have not been shown to the public since the 1930s, and include designs from Patou, Schiaparelli and portraits of Greta Garbo, Frank Lloyd Wright and Fred Astaire. Edward Steichen: In High Fashion, The Condé Nast Years 1923-1937 is laid out in a clever way using, for example, the wallpaper he designed for Stehli...

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Posted by on Sep 11, 2013 in ARTICLES

Black Market Clash, Don’t Miss The Real London Calling!

Black Market Clash, Don’t Miss The Real London Calling!

Black Market Clash opens for two weeks only from the 7th of September. The first pop-up store at 75, Berwick Street in Soho has now become a punk sanctuary, celebrating the release of The Clash Hits Back, the 2-disc best of collection from the British band. The store, art directed by the band and Robert Gordon McHarg III, is certainly unmissable. The guy at the door, wearing a leather jacket (any wonder?), introduces you to the exhibition, split into different sections. On the ground floor, guitars, vinyls and an artwork created especially for the store. Several shelves displaying supercolourful consumer goods, from cereal packs to laundry soap, stamped with black Clash mark. Downstairs, never-before-seen pictures, memorabilia and manuscripts. And of course, the legendary bass Paul Simonon smashed on the iconic London Calling cover of which you’ll surely want to take a picture. Moreover, each week a selected group of 10 people per session can practise some of the most famous band’s tracks with Fender’s product specialists. Some may say...

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Posted by on Sep 6, 2013 in PHOTOGRAPHERS

Peter Walmsley, “It all began with a chemistry course”

Peter Walmsley, “It all began with a chemistry course”

Peter Walmsley is a very active UK-based photographer. His passion for photography started back in school, during a chemistry extra-curricular course on film and print processing, “quite a few years ago now”. He  hasn’t stopped since then. Some of his pictures can be found on our image usage webiste www.photographerlondon.com. That course about film must have been really interesting… Definitely. Feeding film onto a spiral in the dark and later creating prints from an enlarger was a fascinating process and one from which my bedroom carpet suffered occasionally from spilt chemicals. Some years later my first SLR Russian Zenit (built like a tank!) was superseded by a Pentax ME Super: a fairly classic route for many. And there it stayed for quite a few years until digital came along and I plumped for a Sony bridge camera – the DSC 717 in which the body rotates around a most impressive Carl Zeiss lens. That camera also lasted me about 5 years but as technology and interest continued to increase,...

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Posted by on Jul 26, 2013 in ARTICLES

A Capsule With A View

A Capsule With A View

Observation structures are common tourist attractions in big cities around the world. New York’s Empire State Building, Chicago’s Sears Tower, Toronto’s CN Tower, and Taipei’s Taipei 101 – the list goes on – But how many cities can boast that their observation structure is a giant Ferris wheel? A few, maybe. But one thing’s sure. There’s no other place like the London Eye which has become such a magnet for photographers in so little time. Opened in 2000, the London Eye stands 442 feet tall and is located on the South Bank of the river. Originally called The Millennium Wheel, architects created the Eye to celebrate the dawn of the year 2000. Why a Ferris wheel? The turning of the wheel was meant to represent the turning of the century. It is the brainchild of David Marks and Julia Barfield, of Marks Barfield, a husband and wife team of architects. A 1993 competition organized by the Sunday Times newspaper called for ideas for a monument to mark the upcoming...

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Posted by on Jul 11, 2013 in ARTICLES

A Real Waterbed In The Heart Of The City

A Real Waterbed In The Heart Of The City

On the waterways in London there are a collection of floating villages inside the city, a world away from the chaos of London. Everyday there are things going on in places such as the one in this picture, on the Thames at Hammersmith. What’s impressive is that increasingly people decide to go and live on boats. According to the Residential Boat Owners Association, 15000 people in Great Britain live on boats and hundreds of them are in London. Again, in many cases the reason why people make this decision is the need to escape the city while still being part of it. It’s all about being in contact with nature and yet having a great social life. Although many of them are often on the move, floating people normally know each other well and have a strong sense of local community. Besides, people living on boats are usually friendly and sociable, eager to talk about their own experience and share tips and practical knowledge on their peculiar lifestyle. That’s...

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Posted by on Jun 14, 2013 in ARTICLES

Tower Bridge at Dusk

Tower Bridge at Dusk

Of all London’s landmarks, surely Tower Bridge is one of the most internationally recognisable? Opened for business in 1894 after eight years of construction(1886–1894). Originally the bridge had two walkways linking the top of each tower which were open to the public. However, in 1910 they were closed to stop them being used by prostitutes and petty criminals.  They were reopened in 1982 and now only tourists can be found there. Because of the light in this image, taken by photographer Laina Watt, I am reminded of classic film noirs of the 1940s and 50s and wouldn’t be too surprised to see Humphrey Bogart to walk into view any second with his trademark hat and mac. As this is a black and white shot, you could say that it reflects London and its history. The greyness may remind viewers of a grim and feared past, when London was rife with poverty and disease. The industrial revolution had plagued the capital with a thick smog which turned everything a nasty...

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Posted by on Jun 14, 2013 in ARTICLES

Leadenhall Market

Leadenhall Market

At Leadenhall Market we have a classic example of Victorian architecture. For me this place is especially heart-warming as I am a keen fan of “Steampunk” art. For those of you who don’t know what I mean, Steampunk is a contemporary art subculture based entirely in anachronistic Victorian science fiction and fantasy, which is founded on aesthetics from that period. Fashion, music, film and literature make up the Steampunk repertoire, and beautiful architecture like Leadenhall is amongst the best accomplice for such a movement. The wide variety of colours and the gothic fonts used in the signs at Leadenhall give a true image of the past, that make you feel as if you’ve stepped back into the nineteenth century.  As one of the oldest markets in Britain, Leadenhall righjtfully deserves its position as a place where contemporary society can embrace the past in London’s ever changing environment. One thing I really like in this image, is the light reflected on the cobbled ground. This image was taken after a...

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Posted by on Jun 6, 2013 in ARTICLES

Iconic London Underground: A History

Iconic London Underground: A History

This year the London Underground celebrates it’s 150th birthday. Here at Photographer London we wanted to share some of the iconic images we adore. Originally touted nobly as a way to relieve the slums of their impoverished and cramped inhabitants. The plan was to make commuter living a reality for the poor. Nobody cared! Then after a few years the plan was re-touted as an essential tool to keep London prosperous. Bingo! With the backers in place the first line was built barely below the street surface. Steam trains ran frequently and the project was deemed a great success.As public demand grew, more enterprising investors clubbed together to set up rival lines all over the city. The network was born.   The famous London Underground map and the iconic logo appeared respectively in 1931 and 1933. The logo officially known as a Roundel had been around since 1905 and had gradually evolved in design and importance. Now it is an internationally recognised symbol for the city. The map was designed by Harry...

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Posted by on Apr 29, 2013 in ARTICLES

London Images: London History In Video

London Images: London History In Video

  At Photographer London we love everything about our city, especially when we learn something new about the place we call home.  We also love our London images served up in multimedia format, including video. In the following videos focusing on the history of London you can discover how the metropolis has been shaped by disease and specifically cholera as well as pick up all kinds of esoteric information on the area known as the City of London. In the first of our two videos, one of the TED London salon talks, author Steven Johnson takes us on a “10-minute tour of The Ghost Map, his book about a cholera outbreak in 1854 London and the impact it had on science, cities and modern society.” Here’s what some people thought of his lecture along with more links to historical and contemporary facts about London: “A very informative and inspirational story about disease, science & urbanism, but it is one that also has a deep impact on human growth. Its...

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