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Posted by on Nov 5, 2014 in ARTICLES

Edward Steichen: the Condé Nast years exhibition

Edward Steichen: the Condé Nast years exhibition

The Photographers’ Gallery is hosting an exhibition on Edward Steichen’s years as a fashion photographer for Condé Nast. The exhibition is cleverly set out chronologically over three floors, and includes over 200 vintage prints as well as Steichen’s works in original context thanks to copies of Vogue and Vanity Fair. It’s easy to notice the influence of Steichen’s studies as a painter in his photographs, especially in their settings and in the way he did portraiture. Although he took inspiration from painters from the past, his pictures still look contemporary nearly a century later; it’s probably this strength that made him so famous – the talent to create beautiful, timeless shots. Some of the prints on display have not been shown to the public since the 1930s, and include designs from Patou, Schiaparelli and portraits of Greta Garbo, Frank Lloyd Wright and Fred Astaire. Edward Steichen: In High Fashion, The Condé Nast Years 1923-1937 is laid out in a clever way using, for example, the wallpaper he designed for Stehli...

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Posted by on Mar 12, 2014 in ARTICLES

2014 Kraszna-Krausz Book Awards

2014 Kraszna-Krausz Book Awards

The Kraszna-Krausz Foundation revealed on March 6th the shortlist for the Book Awards for photography and moving image books. The authors of the shortlisted books, will be competing for a £10,000 prize and the winners will be announced on April 30th at the Sony World Photography Awards gala ceremony, taking place in London. The Foundation also annouced the recipient of the Outstanding Contribution to Publishing Award, Philippa Brewer, for her dedication to the visual publishing industry. The shortlisted books will be on display at Somerset House from 1-18 May as part of the 2014 Sony World Photography Exhibition and they are: Best Photography Book Award History of Photography in China: Chinese Photographers 1844-1879 by Terry Bennett (Bernard Quaritch Ltd) The Enclave, Photographs by Richard Mosse, by Anna O’Sullivan and Jason Stearns (Aperture) Sergio Larrain: Vagabond Photographer by Agnès Sire and Gonzalo Leiva Quijada (Thames & Hudson) Best Moving Image Book Award Charles Urban: Pioneering the Non-Fiction Film in Britain and America, 1897 – 1925 by Luke McKernan (University of...

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Posted by on Sep 6, 2013 in PHOTOGRAPHERS

Peter Walmsley, “It all began with a chemistry course”

Peter Walmsley, “It all began with a chemistry course”

Peter Walmsley is a very active UK-based photographer. His passion for photography started back in school, during a chemistry extra-curricular course on film and print processing, “quite a few years ago now”. He  hasn’t stopped since then. Some of his pictures can be found on our image usage webiste www.photographerlondon.com. That course about film must have been really interesting… Definitely. Feeding film onto a spiral in the dark and later creating prints from an enlarger was a fascinating process and one from which my bedroom carpet suffered occasionally from spilt chemicals. Some years later my first SLR Russian Zenit (built like a tank!) was superseded by a Pentax ME Super: a fairly classic route for many. And there it stayed for quite a few years until digital came along and I plumped for a Sony bridge camera – the DSC 717 in which the body rotates around a most impressive Carl Zeiss lens. That camera also lasted me about 5 years but as technology and interest continued to increase,...

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Posted by on Jul 8, 2013 in ARTICLES

Photography Ethics: When Are Our Rights Wrong?

Photography Ethics: When Are Our Rights Wrong?

Just because we may have the right to take a picture of someone, does that morally make it ok? It’s hard to say, and as you might expect opinions will differ from person to person. In the UK the gist of the law in relation to taking pictures, DSLRs and iPhones alike, is you can take pictures of whatever you want as long as you’re standing within a public place, with the exception of a few sensitive buildings, like the Ministry of Defence or the MI6 headquarter. If you want to take a picture of the queue at Ministry of Sound however, you are fine to do just that. That’s what the law provides for, but what about morals? What if you take a picture of someone digging their nose when they thought no one was watching, especially whit the 300mm lens whilst you mutter “Gotcha!” as you press the shutter? Or maybe the subject may have had something confidential in their hand that they were about to conceal....

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Posted by on Jun 27, 2013 in ARTICLES

A Walk To The End Of The River

A Walk To The End Of The River

The Museum of London Docklands has plenty of tales to share with its visitors. Facing the West India Docks in Canary Wharf, it is certainly the best venue for this amazing exhibition exploring the Estuary through the works of 12 contemporary artists. The hall is a simple labyrinth of wooden floors and light panels, filled up with a distant sound of waves. It offers a full immersion into the landscapes, history and tales of the river. The Estuary plays the main role here. An industrialised, decayed, nostalgic and overlooked space is protagonist of several paintings, film-making and photographic works in an exhibition open until the 27th of October. Human intervention on the landscape is one of the main topics. Grey industrial buildings, concrete and garbage are threats to the environment recorded by different artists who become real storytellers. Peter Marshall’s series of photographs “Thames Gateway” captures incinerators, housing estates and motorways with wide angle lens; similarly, Jock Mcfadyen’s canvas, “Purfleet from Dracula’s Garden”, portrays panoramic views of roads and...

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Posted by on Jun 26, 2013 in ARTICLES

Ray of light: When Design Meets Photography

Ray of light: When Design Meets Photography

Introducing summer with a selection of light sculptures. That’s FREQ., a photo exhibition that takes its subjects from architectural installations where light is the real protagonist. The exhibition is staged at the Hoxton Gallery, a former Victorian railway arch which offers a dark, dreamlike atmosphere. The exhibition is the result of the collaboration between the design studio Haberdashery and photographer Julian Abrams, both interested in exploring light possibilities at their finest. The former is a creative studio of artists, engineers and image creators which is constantly exploring new conjunctions. The latter is a famous photographer who specialises in architectural work. It seems quite natural to start a crossover between design and photography, then. The co-working team used LEDs and polished stainless steel for 5 installations. One of them is ArcFrequency, an interactive sculpture with a porthole through which people could take a look at the interior. Light changes at a different pace and turn into several shades and shapes. These patterns have been captured in 14 photographic prints, mostly named...

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Posted by on Jun 24, 2013 in ARTICLES

Riding in Hyde Park

Riding in Hyde Park

Hyde Park is one of the biggest London’s eight Royal Parks and definitely the most famous as a venue for national events since the Great Exhibition of 1851. Apart from big celebrations and concerts, Hyde Park offers several quiet places to those who love nature and sports. Rotten Row, once a meeting place for the upper class members, has now become a long route for horse riding. A 1380 metre course available to all customers and members of the local stables. Ross Nye is one of them. Set just along the Rotten Row, it’s one of the most famous stables in London since its foundation in 1965. The riding school is popular among adults and children thanks to the philosophy of the founder and the great location. Hyde Park covers over 350 acres and it’s a spacious plot for horse lovers and trainers to roam and exercise daily until 6 pm, daylight permitting. If you love horses but don’t feel comfortable riding one, you can simply enjoy take a...

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Posted by on Jun 24, 2013 in ARTICLES

Visions of the Universe – Interplanetary Paparazzi

Visions of the Universe – Interplanetary Paparazzi

From the famous “Earthrise” photo where astronauts captured the Earth rising over the surface of the moon, to images of Saturn captured by NASA’s Cassini orbit, a new exhibition, Visions of the Universe, shows off some of the most spectacular space photography of all time. Like interplanetary paparazzi, space scientists including the Astronomer Royal Sir Martin Rees, Wolfgang Tillmans, (the late) Sir Patrick Moore have curated all the sections. The exhibition includes contributions and insights from prominent figures in the world of astronomy, including scientists Dr Chris Lintott and Dr Lucie Green from the BBC’s The Sky at Night, Mars explorer Professor Sanjeev Gupta of Imperial College, space scientist Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock, astro-photographer Dr David Malin and Baron Rees of Ludlow, the Astronomer Royal. Visions of the Universe at the National Maritime Museum, shows how we have created imagary of the heavens over the centuries, from the earliest drawings to photographs taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and the very latest footage from the Mars Curiosity rover. This exhibition...

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Posted by on Jun 24, 2013 in PHOTO TIPS

Photographic Tips and techniques

Photographic Tips and techniques

Tips and techniques in photography can be important, but what is even more important than that, is the message behind the picture.  A Photographer is like a miner and sometimes the reward for a miner’s hard work and effort can be gold. But for the photographer, that gold is a perfect shot. To achieve it, first of all you need to understand what it is that you want to capture. Equally important is to know your gear well enough to use it without thinking. There is lots of tutorial links in the internet world – here are some of our favourites: Hints & Tips for Composing a Perfect Photo http://photo.tutsplus.com/articles/composition-articles/hints-tips-for-composing-a-perfect-photo/ A point of view tutorial http://photography.nationalgeographic.co.uk/photography/photo-tips/creative-point-of-views-richardson/ Photographing people and pets (and many more similar tutorials on the bottom of the page ) http://photography.nationalgeographic.co.uk/photography/photo-tips/people-pets-photos/#/sisters-jumping-california_40420_600x450.jpg Top tips for great pictures _ where do you start? 1. Look your subject in the eye Direct eye contact can be as engaging in a picture as it is in real life. When taking a...

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Posted by on Jun 19, 2013 in ARTICLES

The Gao Brothers: Dualities from China

The Gao Brothers: Dualities from China

On 5 June, the Hua Gallery, a beautiful small space by the river at Battersea that specializes in Chinese art, has become the home to “Between Spiritual and Material Spaces: the Photographic World of the Gao Brothers”. The exhibition is the Brothers’ first in London, and features a collection of photographs which discuss the relationship between individuals and their place within society. As the Gao Brothers come from a generation which has experienced the Cultural Revolution and the Chinese Avant-Garde, their work was expected to be controversial. Instead of shocking images, they express their background and their beliefs through very serene photographs, full of details and hidden emotions. There is also a lot of reflection about dualities: bodies against buildings, natural versus artificial, materiality against spirituality, personal versus collective. As this exhibition is a selection of the artists’ best pictures from their wider body of work, it may feel a little disconnected when seen as a whole. Nevertheless, it is possible to distinguish their influences and their recurrent motifs...

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Posted by on Jun 14, 2013 in ARTICLES

Camden – The home of alternative London

Camden – The home of alternative London

Far from the splendour of the Royal palaces and the exclusive shopping streets, Camden Town should be the first point of call for anyone wanting to experience the alternative side of London. Parts of old Camden are indeed charming, but the contemporary feel of Camden is raw, rugged, raunchy and dangerous. But always exciting! Since the 1980s Camden Town, has become a magnet for every kind of London subculture. Be it Punk, Goth, Hippie, Trans or Emo, it can all be found here.  By day, Camden is best known as home to several large labyrinthine open-air markets (weekends) comprising of independent stallholders, selling whacky, wild and unusual products with everything ranging from Artichokes to a zebra print onesie. A great place to spot new young designers selling gifts, vintage clothing, handmade and secondhand furniture, futuristic, cyberpunk, gothic, burlesque and fetish ware- it’s all available here. The market is also renowned for its delicious street food. There’s a global cuisine on offer here – choose from vegetarian specialities to hearty...

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Posted by on Jun 6, 2013 in ARTICLES

Iconic London Underground: A History

Iconic London Underground: A History

This year the London Underground celebrates it’s 150th birthday. Here at Photographer London we wanted to share some of the iconic images we adore. Originally touted nobly as a way to relieve the slums of their impoverished and cramped inhabitants. The plan was to make commuter living a reality for the poor. Nobody cared! Then after a few years the plan was re-touted as an essential tool to keep London prosperous. Bingo! With the backers in place the first line was built barely below the street surface. Steam trains ran frequently and the project was deemed a great success.As public demand grew, more enterprising investors clubbed together to set up rival lines all over the city. The network was born.   The famous London Underground map and the iconic logo appeared respectively in 1931 and 1933. The logo officially known as a Roundel had been around since 1905 and had gradually evolved in design and importance. Now it is an internationally recognised symbol for the city. The map was designed by Harry...

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Posted by on May 17, 2013 in EQUIPMENT

The Videre: The Pop-Up Pin Hole Project

The Videre: The Pop-Up Pin Hole Project

The creator of the Videre, 24 year old Kelly Angood, is sipping elderflower tea somewhere in trendy east London while I’m sipping cold coffee on my cold balcony South of the river; the only place I could get reception for our phone interview. Kelly is at once warm and funny, putting me at ease, with her Midlands accent via Brighton and London. She explains she has always lived around film cameras and paints me a picture of herself as a child holding a point and shoot from Boots with a caterpillar illustration gracing the front. It wasn’t until the age of 20 that she finally embraced modern digital photography saying both methods have their ‘pros and cons’ and ‘think how many memories were lost before digital?’ Angood believes digital and analogue can and must coexist. Perhaps inspired by the caterpillar on her childhood camera rather than the camera itself, Angood went on to study illustration at Brighton University where, in her own words, they let her ‘do what she...

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Posted by on Apr 29, 2013 in ARTICLES

London Images: London History In Video

London Images: London History In Video

  At Photographer London we love everything about our city, especially when we learn something new about the place we call home.  We also love our London images served up in multimedia format, including video. In the following videos focusing on the history of London you can discover how the metropolis has been shaped by disease and specifically cholera as well as pick up all kinds of esoteric information on the area known as the City of London. In the first of our two videos, one of the TED London salon talks, author Steven Johnson takes us on a “10-minute tour of The Ghost Map, his book about a cholera outbreak in 1854 London and the impact it had on science, cities and modern society.” Here’s what some people thought of his lecture along with more links to historical and contemporary facts about London: “A very informative and inspirational story about disease, science & urbanism, but it is one that also has a deep impact on human growth. Its...

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